magellanic cloud constellation

magellanic cloud constellation插图

Tucana constellation
The Large Magellanic CloudLarge Magellanic CloudThe Large Magellanic Cloud is a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. At a distance of about 50 kiloparsecs, the LMC is the second- or third-closest galaxy to the Milky Way, after the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal and the possible dwarf irregular galaxy known as the Canis Major Overdensity. Based on readily visible stars and a mass of approximately 10 billion solar masses, the diameter of the LMC is ab…en.wikipedia.orgis often listed as an irregular type galaxy because of its appearance,which is likely the result of the galaxy’s tidal interactions with the Milky Way and the Small Magellanic CloudSmall Magellanic CloudThe Small Magellanic Cloud, or Nubecula Minor, is a dwarf galaxy near the Milky Way. Classified as a dwarf irregular galaxy, the SMC has a diameter of about 7,000 light-years, contains several hundred million stars, and has a total mass of approximately 7 billion solar masses. The SMC contains a central bar structure and is speculated to once be a barred spiral galaxy that was disrupted by the Milky Way to becom…en.wikipedia.org(SMC),located inTucana constellation.

How many stars are in the Small Magellanic Cloud?

The Small Magellanic Cloud actually spans 15,000 light-years or so and contains several hundred million stars. About 210,000 light-years away in the constellation of the Tucan (Tucana), it is more distant than other known Milky Way satellite galaxies, including the Sagittarius Dwarf galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud.

Why is the Large Magellanic Cloud considered an irregular type galaxy?

The Large Magellanic Cloud is often listed as an irregular type galaxy because of its appearance, which is likely the result of the galaxy’s tidal interactions with the Milky Way and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), located in Tucana constellation. The LMC has a prominent bar in its central region,…

Where is the Large Magellanic Cloud?

The star belongs to the super star cluster R136, located near the Tarantula Nebula. The LMC is also home to WOH G64, one of the largest stars known. The Large Magellanic Cloud is too far south to be associated with any classical northern myths, but has considerable cultural significance in countries in the southern hemisphere.

What does the LMC have in common with the Magellanic Clouds?

The LMC has a prominent bar in its central region, which indicates that it may have previously been a barred spiral galaxy. The Magellanic Clouds are connected by a bridge of gas, which is a region of active star formation between the two galaxies. The bridge indicates that the Magellanic Clouds are tidally interacting.

What is the name of the satellite galaxy in the Milky Way?

This image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Large Magellanic Cloud , a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way galaxy. The infrared image, a mosaic of 300,000 individual tiles, offers astronomers a unique chance to study the lifecycle of stars and dust in a single galaxy. Nearly one million objects are revealed for the first time in this Spitzer view, which represents about a 1,000-fold improvement in sensitivity over previous space-based missions. Most of the new objects are dusty stars of various ages populating the Large Magellanic Cloud; the rest are thought to be background galaxies. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/M. Meixner (STScI) & the SAGE Legacy Team

Why are the two small galaxies spared the effect of the tidal encounter?

Astronomers have suggested that the two small galaxies have been spared the effect of the tidal encounter because they are speeding past the Milky Way at an unusually high speed, not really giving the larger galaxy a chance to strip them of their gas supply.

What is the fourth largest galaxy in the Local Group?

It is the fourth largest galaxy in the Local Group, after Andromeda Galaxy, the Milky Way, and Triangulum Galaxy. The LMC is also one of very few galaxies that are visible to the unaided eye. The galaxy appears as a faint cloud more than 20 times the width of the full Moon. The visible part of the Large Magellanic Cloud is about 17,000 light years across.

Why is the Large Magellanic Cloud irregular?

The Large Magellanic Cloud is often listed as an irregular type galaxy because of its appearance, which is likely the result of the galaxy’s tidal interactions with the Milky Way and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), located in Tucana constellation. The LMC has a prominent bar in its central region, which indicates that it may have previously been a barred spiral galaxy.

What is the NGC 2014?

NGC 2014 and NGC 2020 – ESO’s Very Large Telescope has captured a detailed view of a star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud — one of the Milky Way’s satellite galaxies. This sharp image reveals two glowing clouds of gas. NGC 2014 (right) is irregularly shaped and red and its neighbour, NGC 2020, is round and blue. These odd and very different forms were both sculpted by powerful stellar winds from exceptionally hot newborn stars that also radiate into the gas, causing it to glow brightly. Image: ESO

How are the magellanic clouds connected?

The Magellanic Clouds are connected by a bridge of gas, which is a region of active star formation between the two galaxies. The bridge indicates that the Magellanic Clouds are tidally interacting. The galaxies also have have a common envelope of neutral hydrogen, which means that they have been gravitationally bound to each other for a very long time. The Small Magellanic Cloud is more distant from us, lying at a distance of about 200,000 light years from Earth.

Where is the Magellanic Cloud located?

Finding the Large Magellanic Cloud is not difficult for observers in the southern hemisphere. For those living below latitude 20°S, the galaxy is circumpolar, which means that it can be seen every night throughout the year if the sky is clear. The LMC is located about 22 degrees from the South Celestial Pole and stretches across an area approximately 9 by 11 degrees on the border between Dorado and Mensa.

Tucana the Toucan, deep in southern skies

The constellation Tucana the Toucan is visible year round from Earth’s Southern Hemisphere. That’s because it’s near the south celestial pole, the point in the sky around which all southern stars revolve. So those of us in the Northern Hemisphere would have to travel southward on Earth’s globe to see Tucana.

Stars of Tucana

The brightest star in Tucana is Alpha Tucanae, a magnitude 2.87 star that lies almost 200 light-years from Earth.

Small Magellanic Cloud

Despite its great distance of 200,000 light-years, the Small Magellanic Cloud is one of the closest galaxies to Earth. You can see it without optical aid as a misty, cloudy patch from dark-sky locations. The Small Magellanic Cloud is an irregular galaxy but has a central bar as part of its structure, making it look like a disturbed former spiral.

47 Tucanae

The globular cluster 47 Tucanae also bears the catalog name NGC 104. It shines bright at magnitude 4.0 and is easily visible with the unaided eye. In excellent seeing conditions, it appears as large as the full moon. It’s the second brightest globular cluster of the Milky Way and contains millions of stars.

Bonus globular cluster

Want a bonus observing target? On the opposite edge of the Small Magellanic Cloud’s curving shape from 47 Tucanae is NGC 362, another bright globular cluster. NGC 362 is a bit dimmer than 47 Tucanae, at magnitude 6.6, but still a good target in binoculars or small telescopes.

The Hubble Deep Field South

The Hubble Space Telescope took a series of famous images called “deep fields”. In these images, the space telescope stared at what mostly looks like a blank area of sky for a long period of time, allowing the faint background objects to come to light. One of these images, the Hubble Deep Field South, came from a region of Tucana.

What is the name of the group of stars in the Tucana system?

The Bayer designation Beta Tucanae refers to a group of six stars in Tucana that are loosely bound into a star system. The system is approximately 140 light years distant from the Sun. The brightest two components have visual magnitudes of 4.36 and 4.53. They are a blue-white dwarf and a white dwarf separated by 27 arc seconds. The brighter component has a magnitude 13.5 star for a companion, and the secondary component has a 6th magnitude companion. Both companions are white main sequence stars.

What is the size of the Tucana constellation?

Tucana is the 48th constellation in size, occupying an area of 295 square degrees. It lies in the first quadrant of the southern hemisphere (SQ1) and can be seen at latitudes between +25° and -90°. The neighboring constellations are Eridanus, Grus, Hydrus, Indus, Octans and Phoenix.

How many stars are there in Tucana?

Tucana contains two formally named stars. The star names approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) are Emiw and Poerava.

How many stars are in the constellation Tucana?

Tucana contains three stars with known planets and no Messier objects. The brightest star in the constellation is Alpha Tucanae, with an apparent magnitude of 2.86. There are no meteor showers associated with the constellation.

What is the stellar classification of Epsilon Tucanae?

Epsilon Tucanae is a blue-white subgiant with the stellar classification of B9IV. It has a visual magnitude of 4.49 and is approximately 374 light years distant from the Sun.

How far is Kappa Tucanae?

Kappa Tucanae is a multiple star system in Tucana. It has a combined apparent magnitude of 4.25 and is 66.6 light years distant.

What is the magnitude of Gamma Tucanae?

Gamma Tucanae is a yellow-white giant with the stellar classification of F1 III. It is the second brightest star in Tucana. It has an apparent magnitude of 3.99 and is 75.3 light years distant from the solar system. It is 1.55 times more massive than the Sun.