omega constellation chronograph automatic

omega constellation chronograph automatic插图

What is an Omega Constellation chronometer?

The Constellation was Omega’s first ever mass-produced chronometer. This watch remains a symbol of precision and elegance to this day. Top models are made of platinum and can withstand magnetic fields of up to 15,000 Gauss.

What is the history of the Omega Constellation?

As with many famous models, the origins of the Omega Constellation begin with the story of another. In 1948, Omega turned 100 years old. To celebrate its centenary, the brand decided to produce a limited edition automatic chronometer. It was named (rather unimaginatively) the Centenary and was incredibly popular.

Is a 36mm Omega Constellation a small watch?

While this was entirely standard for the time, 36mm is now considered the ‘baseline’ for most men’s watches and even then, it is often viewed as being on the smaller side. While the Omega Constellation has never been a small watch, older examples are significantly more compact than most versions that the brand produces today.

How much does an Omega Constellation cost?

If you’re interested in the typical Omega Constellation with four claws, your options include watches made of stainless steel or gold as well as bicolor models. You can purchase a 38-mm stainless steel watch with a Co-Axial caliber for 4,100 USD new. Pre-owned pieces cost around 3,000 USD.

How much does an Omega Constellation cost?

It covers everything from affordable vintage watches for a few hundred dollars to diamond-encrusted gold watches worth well over 100,000 USD. There’s truly something for every taste and budget. The design options are just as diverse. Take your pick from among classic dress watches, sporty yet elegant timepieces with distinctive designs, and various retro models.

What is the size of a retro Globemaster watch?

In particular, its pie-pan dial and fluted bezel pay homage to Constellation watches from the 1960s. At 39-mm, modern Globemasters look great on most wrists. What makes this line truly special is how every watch comes with Master Chronometer certification, meaning they can withstand magnetic fields up to 15,000 gauss.

How much does a 29mm watch cost?

The simple, 29-mm stainless steel variant with a Co-Axial caliber is significantly more affordable. You can get a new model for around 5,200 USD. Used watches change hands for several hundred dollars less. Editions with a mother-of-pearl dial, diamond indices, and diamonds on the bezel cost roughly 8,400 USD in mint condition. You’ll need around 23,500 USD for a Sedna gold watch with a matching gold bracelet.

What is the Omega Globemaster?

While the Omega Globemaster is also part of the Constellation collection , its retro 60s design helps it stand out from the crowd. A so-called "pie-pan" dial, which resembles the namesake bakeware, and fluted bezel characterize this series. What’s more, the Globemaster was the world’s first watch to receive certification as a Master Chronometer, meaning it’s not only extremely accurate but also resistant to magnetic fields up to 15,000 gauss. Top models come with an annual calendar and are made of Sedna gold, Omega’s proprietary rose gold alloy. Limited to a run of 352 pieces, the platinum edition with a blue leather strap is particularly elegant.

How much does a Globemaster watch cost?

A never-worn Sedna gold timepiece demands about 16,000 USD. Prices for pre-owned gold watches sit around 13,500 USD. Two-tone editions with a bracelet in steel and gold cost about 9,200 USD new and 8,000 USD pre-owned.

How much is the Globemaster?

There is also a platinum version of the Globemaster with an annual calendar available. It has an official list price of 53,000 USD, though the same watch sells for about 48,500 USD on Chrono24. Unsurprisingly, the stainless steel versions are much less expensive. Set aside around 6,900 USD for a mint-condition timepiece and 5,800 USD for a pre-owned one. The Sedna gold edition requires an investment of approximately 22,500 USD. Unlike the Globemaster with three hands and a date display, variants with an annual calendar are 41 mm in diameter. An additional central hand points to the current month on a scale around the dial’s edge. Since it is an annual calendar, you only have to manually correct the display once a year at the end of February.

What is the Omega Constellation watch?

Four claws, a golden star, and an integrated band – that’s what defines the Omega Constellation. The Swiss watch manufacturer first introduced this collection in 1952, though the design has changed drastically over the years. For some 30 years, the Constellation had a classic look; however, this was replaced by a much sportier feel. The claws at 3 and 9 o’clock resemble small grips and have been the most prominent features of this timepiece since 1982. Then there’s the integrated band in leather or metal. The latter comes with horizontal links for guaranteed comfort.

What is the most attractive thing about Omega Constellation?

For both men’s and women’s models there are affordable quartz entry points in the current collection. Both ranges top-out with luxurious models crafted from solid gold, with artisanal dials and diamond-studded bezels, which offer a completely different aesthetic from the stainless steel entry-point.

How much does an Omega Constellation watch cost?

Retail prices for quartz-powered Omega Constellation watches start out at under $3,000 and quickly go up from there depending on the size, materials, and movement used. As a point of reference, the all-steel 35mm Constellation with a quartz movement (ref. 123.10.35.60.01.001) comes with an official retail price of just $2,700, while the 39mm automatic version in solid 18k yellow gold retails for $31,700.

Why is the Manhattan considered the Omega constellation?

If human history were to be frozen today, it would be unfair to christen anything but the Manhattan as the quintessential Omega Constellation simply due to its ubiquity and longevity. The case claws may not be to everyone’s tastes, but they do give the family a very clear visual identity that Omega has become adept at selling to a specific portion of its audience.

What are the claws on a Manhattan watch called?

In the original designs, those claws (known as “Griffes ”) clamped down on the bezel, and tucked in beneath the snap-on caseback, holding the bezel and the crystal firmly in-place. Nowadays, they are simply there for decorative purposes and a nod to the origins of what has become the family’s most enduring format. The Manhattan design, which had originally been a very flat affair, was updated in 1995 to include a domed crystal that sat within the confines of the bezel, reducing the claws to a vestigial element.

What calibers are in the Pie Pan?

Although the 360-degree rotors fitted to the 500, 501, and 505 calibers that replaced the 35x series are excellent movements (and highly sought after), they lack a little bit of the anachronistic charm of their forerunners. That being said, they are significantly easier to come by, however rare they remain.

What calibers are replaced by 360 degree rotors?

Although the 360-degree rotors fitted to the 500, 501, and 505 calibers that replaced the 35x series are excellent movements (and highly sought after), they lack a little bit of the anachronistic charm of their forerunners. That being said, they are significantly easier to come by, however rare they remain.

When did the Globemaster come out?

Since then, however, the Constellation range has received very little in the way of an update. Although the Globemaster (which was released in 2015) is technically part of the Constellation collection (and certainly looks the part), it does not bear the name on the dial and so is discounted by many from the official history of the line.

What watches were made in the 1950s?

1950s – 1960s. The vast majority of the Omega Constellation watches from the early 1950s and 1960s followed the same design language and featured the now-iconic pie-pan dials, diamond-shaped hour markers, and a 10-sided winding crown.

How many stars are in the Omega Constellation case?

Regardless of the specific Constellation model, you will find that there is a picture of the Geneva Observatory engraved on the back of its case, sitting under a sky with an arrangement of eight stars. Each star represents the awards won by Omega in the world chronometer competition.

What is the difference between Omega Constellation and stainless steel?

Today, collectors love these watches that feature steel and gold for the classic aesthetic that they offer, while stainless steel and solid gold models provide a slightly more modern take on this instantly-recognizable design.

How long has Omega Constellation been in production?

Given that the Omega Constellation has been in production for nearly 70 years, older examples are plentiful on the secondary market. However, an incredibly wide range of diversity exists within this collection, and there are a few more key things to keep in mind when shopping for one to add to your collection.

What is a constellation dial?

The most iconic vintage Constellation dials are the pie-pan ones from the 1950s and 1960s. These dials are characterized by their raised central area that slopes downward at the chapter ring, making it look like an upside-down pie pan. Many collectors either love or hate pie-pan dials, as they typically offer an inherently vintage overall aesthetic.

When was the Omega Constellation made?

To understand the Omega Constellation and its value on the market, you have to know its history. First released back in 1952 , the Constellation was the brand’s first mass-produced chronometer wristwatch. Coming on the heels of Omega’s incredibly popular centenary timepiece from 1948 (the brand’s very first automatic chronometer watch), the Constellation was Omega’s effort to feed this new precision-focused market and quickly became the brand’s flagship timepiece.

When did Omega get rid of the pie pan dial?

After the 1960s, Omega got rid of these pie-pan dials and replaced them with traditional flat dials that came in a slew of their own variations over the years. For many collectors that favor vintage Constellation watches, a pie-pan dial is an absolutely essential feature.

What makes the Omega Constellation stand out?

One of the things that make the Constellation stand out – in my opinion – from the other Omega families of that time, is that the dials on these Constellation models were richly decorated. The use of gold dials, gold hour markers, onyx hour markers, gold hands and gold applied logos and wording is something that wasn’t seen on any of their other collections to this extent. Some of the gold dials had a satin-brushed finish, others had a sun-guilloché pattern or a cross-hatched dial. There were many different dials available for the Omega Constellation in the 1950s and 1960s.

How small is an Omega Constellation?

One of them is that it is a small watch for today’s standards. With a diameter of approx. 34mm it is quite small. In retrospect, it was quite smart of Rolex to create their Oyster Perpetual Day-Date (ref.1803) in 36mm, as that was considered normal for a long time while 34mm is considered small for 10-15 years now. Since I mentioned the Rolex Day-Date anyway, it is interesting to know that a full gold vintage Omega Constellation with gold bracelet was a bit more expensive in those days than the Rolex Day-Date 1803. Although the Omega Constellation Grand Luxe on a gold Reinhor bracelet fetches more than the average gold Day-Date on President bracelet, most gold Constellations are still cheaper to get than a gold Day-Date.

What is the Constellation watch?

The Omega Constellation watch was once the flagship in the Omega collection. This particular family within their collection dates back to 1952 and according to Omega’s Journey Through Time publication (2007) it was because their limited produced Centenary collection was so high in demand by customers. This 1948 Omega Centenary commemorated the 100th birthday of the Omega company and was their first automatic chronometer watch. It wasn’t made in series production but the demand for them was so high, that Omega decided to create a new family of automatic chronometer watches in 1952: The Constellation.

What is the dial on an Omega Constellation watch?

The pie-pan dials (see photo below) were commonly used in the vintage Omega Constellation watches. The use of the gold diamond-shaped hour markers is less common and only seen on the earlier models. In the 1960s Omega added the use of the Onyx stick markers on some of the Constellation models. Better said, these are gold hour markers with an Onyx inlay.

What makes a constellation attractive?

Another thing that makes the Constellation attractive to a lot of collectors are those nice fancy lugs. Those early Omega Constellations have rounded lugs and were later a bit more restyled to the 1960s. A bit more rectangular, sharp edges but still very elegant (2nd photo below).

When did Omega start making chronometer watches?

It wasn’t made in series production but the demand for them was so high, that Omega decided to create a new family of automatic chronometer watches in 1952: The Constellation. The first Omega Constellation models had bumper movements and distinctive diamond shaped hour markers.

Can you have an Omega Constellation on a gold bracelet?

If you want to have an Omega Constellation on a gold bracelet, like pictured in this article, the price might even double. However, always keep in mind that it is all about condition! Although Omega is able to service a lot of their vintage watches, having a calibre 354 (bumper), 50x, 55x or 56x serviced will cost you.