omega constellation connie

omega constellation connie插图

Why does the Omega Constellation have a 10 sided crown?

The 10-sided Omega crown is one of the defining features of the vintage ‘Connie’, as collectors often fondly refer to this watch. And if you’ve seen early Constellations with Seamaster crowns, it’s worth noting that these aren’t original. If Omega serviced these watches, they would have been replaced with the correct decagonal versions.

Is the Omega Constellation a vintage watch?

It’s one of those vintage watches almost every collector seeks at some point in their perpetual search for another piece to add to their collection. First appearing in 1952, the Constellation was designed to be Omega’s bellwether watch.

Is the Omega Connie the king of Omega watches?

The sheer number of variants of Constellation – from the classical pieces of the ’50s to the crazier designs of the ’70s and beyond – makes these watches endlessly appealing, turning collecting into a lifelong quest. No matter how many angles you look at it, the Connie is the king of Omega.

What is the Omega Constellation Manhattan?

That year, designer Carol Didisheim created the Omega Constellation Manhattan model with a distinct bezel that featured four claws (known as “Griffes”), an integrated bracelet, and a chronometer-rated movement. Today, much of the design DNA that defines the Constellation range is based on the original ‘Manhattan’ model.

What is the Omega Constellation?

The Omega Constellation is so easily wearable. It’s one of those vintage watches almost every collector seeks at some point in their perpetual search for another piece to add to their collection. First appearing in 1952, the Constellation was designed to be Omega’s bellwether watch. This was the brand’s first mass-produced chronometer grade wristwatch and the brainchild of designer René Bannwart (who later founded Corum.) The Constellation was originally called the ‘Globemaster’ in the USA, though it was dropped in 1956 as Douglas Aircraft, manufacturers of the huge transport planes of the same name, held the trademark on the name. (As an aside, last year Omega brought that historic Globemaster name back, in a watch that channels the spirit of the original). And while the Constellation has a long and broad history, today I’m going to focus on its golden age, which ran from 1952 to the 1970s.

What is the Geneva Observatory logo?

This denotes chronometer grade status of the movement, which means it’s been subjected to a series of performance tests including various temperatures and positions, and remained accurate to between +6 and -4 seconds per day. When evaluating a Constellation, dealers and collectors rate the level of wear or over-polishing by looking closely at the stars in the Constellation logo. In the best examples, all the stars appear clearly, and haven’t been worn down over time.

What is the most popular bracelet in the constellation?

Two varieties stand out as most popular in the vintage range of Constellation bracelets. The ‘beads of rice’ bracelet is the first, closely followed by the brick link style. In solid gold, you will also find the Milanese woven. Personally, I prefer a leather band with an authentic Omega buckle to complete the look – if you can find one.

Why do my hands have patina?

Often hands will take on their own patina due to moisture and breakdown of the plating, with spotting most visible when viewed at an angle. And, sure, it’s great to have pristine hands that reflect the light like a mirror, but you can’t always get that – so having an original set of hands that matches the age of the dial is always an asset. Be sure to check that the second hand extends to the edge of the seconds register. Any more or less suggests it may not be original, and certainly warrants a more thorough inspection.

What is the most sought after gold?

Platinum cases are rare as hen’s teeth, while the stainless steel grasshopper lug version is among the most sought after – and an excellent choice for anyone wishing to start off their collection.

What watches were made in the 1950s?

1950s – 1960s. The vast majority of the Omega Constellation watches from the early 1950s and 1960s followed the same design language and featured the now-iconic pie-pan dials, diamond-shaped hour markers, and a 10-sided winding crown.

How many stars are in the Omega Constellation case?

Regardless of the specific Constellation model, you will find that there is a picture of the Geneva Observatory engraved on the back of its case, sitting under a sky with an arrangement of eight stars. Each star represents the awards won by Omega in the world chronometer competition.

What is the difference between Omega Constellation and stainless steel?

Today, collectors love these watches that feature steel and gold for the classic aesthetic that they offer, while stainless steel and solid gold models provide a slightly more modern take on this instantly-recognizable design.

How long has Omega Constellation been in production?

Given that the Omega Constellation has been in production for nearly 70 years, older examples are plentiful on the secondary market. However, an incredibly wide range of diversity exists within this collection, and there are a few more key things to keep in mind when shopping for one to add to your collection.

What is a constellation dial?

The most iconic vintage Constellation dials are the pie-pan ones from the 1950s and 1960s. These dials are characterized by their raised central area that slopes downward at the chapter ring, making it look like an upside-down pie pan. Many collectors either love or hate pie-pan dials, as they typically offer an inherently vintage overall aesthetic.

When was the Omega Constellation made?

To understand the Omega Constellation and its value on the market, you have to know its history. First released back in 1952 , the Constellation was the brand’s first mass-produced chronometer wristwatch. Coming on the heels of Omega’s incredibly popular centenary timepiece from 1948 (the brand’s very first automatic chronometer watch), the Constellation was Omega’s effort to feed this new precision-focused market and quickly became the brand’s flagship timepiece.

When did Omega get rid of the pie pan dial?

After the 1960s, Omega got rid of these pie-pan dials and replaced them with traditional flat dials that came in a slew of their own variations over the years. For many collectors that favor vintage Constellation watches, a pie-pan dial is an absolutely essential feature.

What is the Omega Constellation?

The Omega Constellation is so easily wearable. It’s one of those vintage watches almost every collector seeks at some point in their perpetual search for another piece to add to their collection. First appearing in 1952, the Constellation was designed to be Omega’s bellwether watch. This was the brand’s first mass-produced chronometer grade wristwatch and the brainchild of designer René Bannwart (who later founded Corum.) The Constellation was originally called the ‘Globemaster’ in the USA, though it was dropped in 1956 as Douglas Aircraft, manufacturers of the huge transport planes of the same name, held the trademark on the name. (As an aside, last year Omega brought that historic Globemaster name back, in a watch that channels the spirit of the original.) And while the Constellation has a long and broad history, today I’m going to focus on its golden age, which ran from 1952 to the 1970s.

What chronometer is used for the constellation?

The first of the chronometer grade movements for the Constellation were the calibre 354. These were bumper automatic winding movements, which meant they wound via a rotor that ‘bumped’ back and forth between two springs. The bumps can feel a little jarring, but don’t be alarmed, that’s the way the movement operates.

What is the Geneva Observatory logo?

This denotes chronometer grade status of the movement, which means it’s been subjected to a series of performance tests including various temperatures and positions, and remained accurate to between +6 and -4 seconds per day. When evaluating a Constellation, dealers and collectors rate the level of wear or over-polishing by looking closely at the stars in the Constellation logo. In the best examples, all the stars appear clearly, and haven’t been worn down over time.

What is the most popular bracelet in the constellation?

Two varieties stand out as most popular in the vintage range of Constellation bracelets. The ‘beads of rice’ bracelet is the first, closely followed by the brick link style. In solid gold, you will also find the Milanese woven. Personally, I prefer a leather band with an authentic Omega buckle to complete the look – if you can find one.

Why do my hands have patina?

Often hands will take on their own patina due to moisture and breakdown of the plating, with spotting most visible when viewed at an angle. And, sure, it’s great to have pristine hands that reflect the light like a mirror, but you can’t always get that – so having an original set of hands that matches the age of the dial is always an asset. Be sure to check that the second hand extends to the edge of the seconds register. Any more or less suggests it may not be original, and certainly warrants a more thorough inspection.

What is the most sought after gold?

Platinum cases are rare as hen’s teeth, while the stainless steel grasshopper lug version is among the most sought after – and an excellent choice for anyone wishing to start their collection.