what constellations are visible in january

what constellations are visible in january插图

outerspaceuniverse.orgImage: outerspaceuniverse.orgThe constellations best seen in January areCaelum, Dorado, Lepus, Mensa, Orion, Pictor, Reticulum and Taurus. Two of these constellations – Orion and Taurus – are quite prominent in the evening sky, while others are simply best observed at this time of year.

What is the best constellation to see in January?

January Constellations The constellations best seen in January are Caelum, Dorado, Lepus, Mensa, Orion, Pictor, Reticulum and Taurus. Two of these constellations – Orion and Taurus – are quite prominent in the evening sky, while others are simply best observed at this time of year.

What constellations are in the sky in January 2021?

Deep Sky Objects to Look For in January 2021 Constellations that are prominent in the early evening sky at this time of the year include Lyra, Cygnus, Aquila, Cassiopeia, and Perseus. Orion, Taurus, Auriga, and Gemini rise somewhat later, and all should be fully visible from mid-northern latitudes after about midnight or so.

What can you see in January’s night sky?

January’s combination of crisp, clear winter nights and a southeastern sky filled with celestial wonders makes it well worth bundling up and scanning the heavens! We’ll help you navigate the night sky with these highlights and the map below. Orion, the Hunter, is not the largest constellation, but it is unquestionably the brightest.

Which constellations are visible in the evening sky?

Two of these constellations – Orion and Taurus – are quite prominent in the evening sky, while others are simply best observed at this time of year. Orion, Taurus and Lepus are northern constellations, located in the first quadrant of the northern hemisphere, while others lie in the first quadrant south of the celestial equator.

What are the most common targets for a telescope?

The most popular telescope targets include the Orion Nebula (M43), the Crab Nebula (M1) , the Pleiades (M45) and Hyades clusters, and the Large Magellanic Cloud. Taurus and Orion are the largest and best known January constellations. Known since ancient times, these constellations dominate the northern winter sky and host a number …

What constellations are in the sky in January?

January Constellations. The constellations best seen in January are Caelum, Dorado, Lepus, Mensa, Orion, Pictor, Reticulum and Taurus. Two of these constellations – Orion and Taurus – are quite prominent in the evening sky, while others are simply best observed at this time of year. Orion, Taurus and Lepus are northern constellations, …

What constellations are in the first quadrant of the hemisphere?

Orion, Taurus and Lepus are northern constellations, located in the first quadrant of the northern hemisphere, while others lie in the first quadrant south of the celestial equator. January is the best time of year to observe a number of famous deep sky objects located in these constellations. The most popular telescope targets include …

Where is Lepus located?

Located just south of the celestial equator, Lepus is not as prominent as Orion and Taurus, but contains several notable deep sky objects which make it a popular target among stargazers. These include the globular cluster Messier 79, the Spirograph Nebula (IC 418), a planetary nebula named for its striking appearance, and the irregular galaxy NGC 1821.

What is the name of the object in Taurus?

Image: NASA, ESA, AURA, Caltech, Palomar Observatory. Taurus contains another famous Messier object: the Crab Nebula. Catalogued as Messier 1, the nebula is an expanding remnant of a supernova event observed in 1054 AD.

How many stars are in the Pleiades?

The Pleiades is an open cluster consisting of approximately 3,000 stars at a distance of 400 light-years (120 parsecs) from Earth in the constellation Taurus. (It also known as “The Seven Sisters”, or the astronomical designations NGC 1432/35 and M45.) Image: NASA, ESA, AURA, Caltech, Palomar Observatory.

How big is the constellation Orion?

It occupies an area of 797 square degrees. Like other zodiac constellations, it was first catalogued by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century, but has been known since the Bronze Age. Deep sky objects in Orion and Taurus, image: Wikisky.

How do constellations change in the evening sky?

Stars rise and set four minutes earlier each night and, as a result, we see constellations rising and setting two hours earlier each month. They move by 90 degrees from one season to the next and return to the same position after a full year. Each constellation is best seen in the evening sky at a certain time of year, whether it only briefly shows up above the horizon or it is visible throughout the year from a certain location.

What time of year can you see constellations?

Below is the list of constellations visible at 9 pm each month. These are not all the constellations that can be seen in the evening sky at any particular …

Is Tucana visible in the evening?

Tucana. Even though each given month is the best time to observe a particular constellation in the evening, the constellation may not be visible from every location on Earth.

What are the six January constellations?

January Constellations. The six January constellations include such notable groups as Orion, the hunter, and Taurus, the bull. Hidden among these stellar groupings can be found the famous Orion Nebula, one of the brightest nebulae in the sky. Orion is also the home of the famous Horsehead Nebula, a dark region of dust in the shape …

Where are the Pleiades located?

The Pleiades is a small cluster of young stars still nestled in parts of the gas nebula that formed them. Viewers in southern latitudes can see the Large Magellanic Cloud, an irregular galaxy located very close to our own Milky Way.

What is the name of the nebula in Orion?

Orion is also the home of the famous Horsehead Nebula, a dark region of dust in the shape of a horse’s head set against a beautiful pink reflection nebula. Also visible are the Pleiades, also known as the seven sisters.

How big is Mercury in the night sky?

Follow Mercury through a telescope. When it first appears in the evening sky, it’s almost full (98 percent lit) and spans a mere 5". By January 14, its gibbous phase (84 percent lit) is obvious, and by January 23, it’s down to 56 percent lit and has swelled to 7" in diameter.

How far apart are Mars and Uranus?

On the way, Mars passes apparently close to Uranus, a great time to spot that distant world. From the 18th to the 22nd, Mars and Uranus stand less than 2° apart. Uranus is exactly 1.7° due south of Mars January 21. Swing binoculars toward Mars and look for Uranus to its south, shining at magnitude 5.8.

What is the magnitude of Neptune?

Neptune is an easy binocular object for the first few hours of January evenings, shining at magnitude 7.8 in eastern Aquarius. On January 1, it is 1° east of Phi (?) Aquarii, a 4th-magnitude star 21° due south of Markab in the Square of Pegasus.

What is the magnitude of Venus on January 23rd?

On the 23rd, Mercury sets an hour and a half after the Sun and is a bright magnitude –0.6. Venus sits between M20 and M8 the morning of January 9. Although only the planet is visible to the naked eye, the star cluster within each nebula will appear in binoculars or a telescope. Follow Mercury through a telescope.

How many magnitudes does a 6 inch scope pick up?

From the suburbs, a 6-inch scope will readily pick up the 10th-magnitude dot. A 4-incher will do nicely under darker skies or for a patient city observer using high power. Thanks to the “partly cloudy” dust lanes in Taurus, Psyche won’t be lost amid the populated Perseus spiral arm crossing the background. To positively identify it, make a sketch of the field and come back later to confirm which speck of light has shifted. Psyche slides only 6′ in 24 hours, so there’s little chance of catching its motion during a single observing session.

How big is Mars in January?

Starting the month with an apparent size of 10" and a magnitude of –0.3, it is best viewed with scopes larger than 8 inches. Smaller scopes can achieve good results using a planetary video camera and a quality barlow lens.

What is the moon and Mercury paired?

The Moon and Mercury form an elegant pairing on January 14, standing about apart. Saturn is quickly lost in the sunset glow and heads for its January 23 conjunction with the Sun. Jupiter also slides away, now 4.6° to the lower right of Mercury (due west).

Rising Moon: Ports in a storm

There’s no hiding the crater Kepler! The youthful impact scar stands out on the Moon’s equator, a veritable island in Oceanus Procellarum, the large basin on the eastern flank of our satellite. Kepler is a smaller version of the prominent Copernicus, which lies closer to the Moon’s center.

Comet Search: Bowling across the stars

Comet C/2021 A1 (Leonard) claimed the title of comet of the year in 2021, but it plummets to 12th magnitude by January’s end.

Locating Asteroids: Ceres serenades the Bull

The famous dust clouds surrounding the Pleiades (M45) spread far and wide. They hide many distant stars, helping us locate and track dwarf planet 1 Ceres this month.

Watch for These Constellation Favorites

Our January Sky Map hones in on the best of the month’s night sky! The color star chart ( PDF) is free each month to use in finding constellations, planets, and more!

The Brightest Sky of the Year

January’s combination of crisp, clear winter nights and a southeastern sky filled with celestial wonders makes it well worth bundling up and scanning the heavens! We’ll help you navigate the night sky with these highlights and the map below.

Note: How to Read the Sky Map

Our monthly sky map does not show the entire sky which would be almost impossible. Instead, the map focuses on a particular region of the sky each month where something interesting is happening. The legend on the map always tells you which direction you should facing, based on midnight viewing.

January 3 – Peak of the Quadrantids Meteor Shower

For the first astronomy event you can see this year, there’s a meteor shower to look for. The Quadrantids, the first meteor shower of the year, is expected to peak on January 3rd. On that night, look for a maximum of 80 meteors per hour radiating from a point in the northern sky.

January 4 – Earth at Perihelion

The next astronomical event of 2021 is actually not one you can see – but you’re literally going to experience it whether you know it or not. On January 4th, the earth will reach its closest point to the sun, called “perihelion.”

January 5 – Conjunction of the Moon & Jupiter

Unlike in recent months, there’s only one big planetary conjunction to mention this month: the Moon and Jupiter will appear close together in the sky on the evening of January 5th. On this night, the two will appear roughly 4°27′ apart – that’s roughly the distance if you hold up your pointer, middle, and ring fingers together at arms length.

January 11 – Mercury at its Evening Peak

If you’ve been reading this site for a while, you know that spotting Mercury with my un-aided eye is on my astronomy bucket list; I’ve got another chance – and so do you – on January 11th when the tiny planet reaches its evening peak 13° above the southwestern horizon.

January 13 – Asteroid 7 Iris at Opposition

In case you aren’t familiar with the term, “opposition” describes the arrangement of celestial objects where the sun is on one side of Earth and the object is directly opposite – like a sun-earth-object sandwich in space.

January 19 – Peak of the γ-Ursae Minorid Meteor Shower

If the full moon or cloudy skies cause an issue with spotting the Quadrantids earlier in the month, you might try to spot the less impressive γ-Ursae Minorids. The Gamma Ursae Minorids appear to radiate from the constellation Ursa Minor, near the bright north star of Polaris.

How far above the horizon is Mercury?

This means that if you look west just after sunset, you should be able to see Mercury about 12 degrees above the horizon. It will be very bright, so easily spotable by eye. Look for something that looks like a plane, but does not blink.

What constellation is UGC 1810 in?

UGC 1810 and UGC 1813 are a pair of interacting galaxies in the Andromeda constellation. While the larger galaxy, designated UGC 1810, might appear to be distorted by the interaction, it is, in fact, an almost perfect spiral galaxy whose outer regions are partly obscured by dark dust clouds. The active star-forming regions that are visible outside of the dust clouds are the result of a long-term gravitational tug-of-war with the less massive galaxy, designated UGC 1813, shown at the bottom of the frame.

How old is the globular cluster of stars?

The cluster is around 13.7 billion years old and is about 230,000 times as massive as the Sun.

What is the closest point to the Sun on January 2?

January 2: Earth is in Perihelion. Our orbit around the Sun is not perfectly circular, therefore once a year we end up in the closest point to the Sun (perihelion) and the furthest (aphelion). On this day the Earth will be at the closest point to the Sun, at a distance of 0.983 AU.

Where is the Flaming Star Nebula located?

Located about 1,500 light-years away in the constellation Auriga, the magnitude 6.0 Flaming Star Nebula is both an emission and reflection nebula. The nebula emits radiation from the embedded star AE Aurigae while it reflects radiation from the nearby open star clusters Messier 36 and Messier 38, as well as from the star Iota Aurigae, and the emission nebula IC 410.

Which constellations are visible in the early evening sky?

Constellations that are prominent in the early evening sky at this time of the year include Lyra, Cygnus, Aquila, Cassiopeia, and Perseus. Orion, Taurus, Auriga, and Gemini rise somewhat later, and all should be fully visible from mid-northern latitudes after about midnight or so.