which constellation is home to the stephan’s quintet

which constellation is home to the stephan’s quintet插图

Pegasus

What is the Stephan’s quintet?

The Stephan’s quintet – also known as Hickson Compact Group 92 – is a group of five galaxies that are very close to each other. It is located in the direction of the Pegasus constellation and they are approximately 280 million light-years away from Earth. Four of the five galaxies are so close they interact gravitationally with each other.

How does NGC 7320 differ from the other galaxies in Stephan’s quintet?

With an apparent magnitude of 13.2, it is the brightest member of Stephan’s Quintet. However, it is not physically associated with the other four galaxies. It has a small redshift (about 790 km/s), while the other galaxies have redshifts of almost 6,600 km/s. NGC 7320 is about seven times closer than the rest of the group.

Was Stephan’s quintet the first compact galaxy discovered?

A new image produced by the James Webb Space Telescope reveals new details of Stephan’s Quintet, the very first compact galaxy group ever discovered that was featured in the 1946 film It’s a Wonderful Life. I’m quite sure most readers of the column are familiar with the holiday classic It’s a Wonderful Life.

How often do galaxies in Stephan’s quintet interact with each other?

Four of the five galaxies in Stephan’s Quintet regularly interact with each other, creating the stunning display we see here. NASA/ESA/CSA/STScI Most NASA images are in the public domain.

What is the name of the group of galaxies that are closer to Earth than the rest of the galaxy?

Studies have shown that group member NGC 7320 , at upper left, is actually a foreground galaxy about seven times closer to Earth than the rest of the group. Three of the galaxies have distorted shapes, elongated spiral arms, and long, gaseous tidal tails containing myriad star clusters, proof of their close encounters.

What is the name of the group of stars that are a group of five galaxies?

This portrait of Stephan’s Quintet, also known as Hickson Compact Group 92, was taken by the new Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) aboard NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Stephan’s Quintet, as the name implies, is a group of five galaxies. The name, however, is a bit of a misnomer. Studies have shown that group member NGC 7320, at upper left, is actually a foreground galaxy about seven times closer to Earth than the rest of the group. Three of the galaxies have distorted shapes, elongated spiral arms, and long, gaseous tidal tails containing myriad star clusters, proof of their close encounters. These interactions have sparked a frenzy of star birth in the central pair of galaxies. This drama is being played out against a rich backdrop of faraway galaxies. The image, taken in visible and near-infrared light, showcases WFC3’s broad wavelength range. The colors trace the ages of the stellar populations, showing that star birth occurred at different epochs, stretching over hundreds of millions of years. The camera’s infrared vision also peers through curtains of dust to see groupings of stars that cannot be seen in visible light. NGC 7319, at top right, is a barred spiral with distinct spiral arms that follow nearly 180 degrees back to the bar. The blue specks in the spiral arm at the top of NGC 7319 and the red dots just above and to the right of the core are clusters of many thousands of stars. Most of the quintet is too far away even for Hubble to resolve individual stars. Continuing clockwise, the next galaxy appears to have two cores, but it is actually two galaxies, NGC 7318A and NGC 7318B. Encircling the galaxies are young, bright blue star clusters and pinkish clouds of glowing hydrogen where infant stars are being born. These stars are less than 10 million years old and have not yet blown away their natal cloud. Far away from the galaxies, at right, is a patch of intergalactic space where many star clusters are forming. NGC 7317, at bottom left, is a normal-looking elliptical galaxy that is less affected by the interactions. Sharply contrasting with these galaxies is the dwarf galaxy NGC 7320 at upper left. Bursts of star formation are occurring in the galaxy’s disk, as seen by the blue and pink dots. In this galaxy, Hubble can resolve individual stars, evidence that NGC 7320 is closer to Earth. NGC 7320 is 40 million light-years from Earth. The other members of the quintet reside 290 million light-years away in the constellation Pegasus. These farther members are markedly redder than the foreground galaxy, suggesting that older stars reside in their cores. The stars’ light also may be further reddened by dust stirred up in the encounters. Image: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble SM4 ERO Team

What galaxy has merged with each other?

The galaxies in the middle of the group, NGC 7318A and NGC 7318B (mag. 14.4 and 13.9), have already started to merge with each other. The collision has drawn out long tails of stars from each galaxy and triggered massive bursts of star forming activity.

How many cores does the next galaxy have?

Continuing clockwise, the next galaxy appears to have two cores, but it is actually two galaxies, NGC 7318A and NGC 7318B. Encircling the galaxies are young, bright blue star clusters and pinkish clouds of glowing hydrogen where infant stars are being born.

What is the magnitude of NGC 7319?

NGC 7319 is a barred spiral galaxy distorted by the interaction with other galaxies in the group. It has an apparent magnitude of 14.4 and occupies 1.7’ by 1.3’ of the apparent sky. The galaxy has a type 2 Seyfert nucleus and the characteristic bright core.

How far away is NGC 7320?

NGC 7320 is 40 million light-years from Earth. The other members of the quintet reside 290 million light-years away in the constellation Pegasus. These farther members are markedly redder than the foreground galaxy, suggesting that older stars reside in their cores.

What is the size of NGC 7317?

NGC 7317 has a slightly oval disk and is classified as an elliptical galaxy. It has an apparent magnitude of 14.57 and an apparent size of 0.4’ by 0.4’. The galaxy spans less than 0.5 arc minutes across.

What is the name of the group of galaxies that are closer to Earth than the rest of the galaxy?

Studies have shown that group member NGC 7320 , at upper left, is actually a foreground galaxy about seven times closer to Earth than the rest of the group. Three of the galaxies have distorted shapes, elongated spiral arms, and long, gaseous tidal tails containing myriad star clusters, proof of their close encounters.

What is the blue speck in the NGC 7319?

The blue specks in the spiral arm at the top of NGC 7319 and the red dots just above and to the right of the core are clusters of many thousands of stars. Most of the quintet is too far away even for Hubble to resolve individual stars.

How far away is NGC 7320?

NGC 7320 is 40 million light-years from Earth. The other members of the quintet reside 290 million light-years away in the constellation Pegasus. These farther members are markedly redder than the foreground galaxy, suggesting that older stars reside in their cores.

How many cores does the next galaxy have?

Continuing clockwise, the next galaxy appears to have two cores, but it is actually two galaxies, NGC 7318A and NGC 7318B. Encircling the galaxies are young, bright blue star clusters and pinkish clouds of glowing hydrogen where infant stars are being born.

What color are the stars in the galaxy quintet?

Stephan’s Quintet. A clash among members of a famous galaxy quintet reveals an assortment of stars across a wide color range, from young, blue stars to aging, red stars.

Where is the dwarf galaxy 7320?

Sharply contrasting with these galaxies is the dwarf galaxy NGC 7320 at upper left. Bursts of star formation are occurring in the galaxy’s disk, as seen by the blue and pink dots. In this galaxy, Hubble can resolve individual stars, evidence that NGC 7320 is closer to Earth. NGC 7320 is 40 million light-years from Earth. The other members of the quintet reside 290 million light-years away in the constellation Pegasus.

How old are NGC 7317?

These stars are less than 10 million years old and have not yet blown away their natal cloud. Far away from the galaxies, at right, is a patch of intergalactic space where many star clusters are forming. NGC 7317, at bottom left, is a normal-looking elliptical galaxy that is less affected by the interactions.

What constellation is Stephan’s Quintet?

The constellation Pegasus features a cluster of five galaxies whose violent interactions with each other have intrigued scientists for years. Known as Stephan’s Quintet, this galactic gathering is also a favored target of astrophotographers, but its greatest claim to fame is a cameo role in one of the most beloved and inspirational movies …

How far away is the fifth member of the Foursome?

Because of the two dimensional nature of this image, the fifth member (to the lower left of the middle pair) appears adjacent to the others; in reality, it is “only” 40 million light years away.

Will all four galaxies merge?

Eventually, all four will likely either transform into elliptical galaxies or merge into a single large galaxy. Thousands of astronomers and space enthusiasts have viewed or imaged Stephan’s Quintet, but millions of other people have unwittingly seen it in the opening scenes of the classic 1946 film, “It’s a Wonderful Life.

Who discovered the eponymous galaxy cluster?

Image credit: NASA. French astronomer Edouard Stephan discovered this eponymous cluster in 1877 at the Marseille Observatory in France. Scientists later classified it as a compact galaxy cluster, a group defined by its compactness, remoteness from other galaxies, and limited variability of brightness among its members.

Did Clarence save George?

By the end of the movie, Clarence has saved George and earned his wings. Perhaps another scene could have been added with Clarence now in the form of a galaxy rather than a star, but that will have to wait for the remake.